The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan

The lightning thief

Percy Jackson has gotten kicked out of many schools.  All these weird things keep happening to him.  It isn’t his fault.  But then it gets a little overwhelming.  A Minotaur is chasing him!  Eventually, he is guided to a camp called Camp Halfblood where he finds out that his dad is a Greek God.  At this camp, there are other children of Greek Gods. However, things go wrong when the King of the Gods, Zeus, accuses Percy of stealing his weapon. That sends Percy on a quest to find it. Will he come up short or will he be the hero?  Read the Lightning Thief.

-Ben (Teen Reviewer)

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Hoot by Carl Hiaasen

Hoot

 

Another state another school. Roy Eberhhardt just moved from Montana to Florida. He thinks school will be normal but when looking out the school bus window he notices something strange. A boy running bare foot.  Later he decides to follow that boy. And little did he know he would be in over his head. He finds out the boy wants to vandalize a construction company to save the owls. Can only a couple kids stop a powerful company and save the owls?  Read Hoot by Carl Hiaasen.

-Ben (Teen Reviewer)

Memoirs of An Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks

Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend

Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend is an amazing book that just makes you think. The premises of this story is that all of your imaginary friends are actually real, but they can only interact with you and other imaginary friends.   However, once you stop believing in your imaginary friend they disappear.  Max is a boy who is around the age of 8. He has an imaginary friend named Budo. When Max gets in trouble Budo must choose between helping Max and possibly disappearing or remaining by letting Max stay in trouble.  This book is amazing.  I would recommend it to anyone who really likes to think about what they read. This book made me smile and cry.  It has action and suspense.  The characters are extremely likeable and you really feel for them.

-Lizzie (Teen Reviewer)

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

poet xXiomara appears to be a tough as nails high school student but this Afro-Latino young lady has a much softer side to her. She loves poetry and in a school where drugs, crime, and sex happens all too frequently, X (as known by friends) keeps her passion close to her heart. Xiomara’s beloved teacher helps her to free herself by encouraging her to join a poetry club. For the first time and not under the thumb of her mother, school, or God, she becomes The Poet X. I loved how the author read this audiobook.

-KC

Harbor Me by Jacqueline Woodson

harbor meWhen a group of young Brooklyn students are given the opportunity to gather together in a safe, adult free classroom, they begin an explorative journey through dialogue, poetry, revelation, and storytelling. Jacqueline Woodson taps into the most current challenges that many our youth face today with such unbridled courage and sheer eloquence.

-KC

Unwind- A Teen Reader Review

Cover image for Unwind

Title: Unwind

Author: Neal Shusterman

Summary: The Second Civil War is over.  The Pro-Choice and Pro-Life armies finally came to an agreement.  All children are safe until age 13.  Then, until age 18 their parents have a choice.  They can unwind their children; take apart their bodies and use 100% of their parts as transplants to aid other living humans, so the children never truly die.  This twisted dystopia chills you to the bone, the circumstances far too realistic, and the world’s reaction way too real.  Unwind by Neal Shusterman leaves you with the chilling question, what if?

The novel follows Connor Lassiner, a problem child with an unwind warrant signed who is desperate to survive.  Risa Ward, a girl who is unwound as a budget cut, who has the smarts to escape her fate.  And Lev Calder, a boy born to be unwound, who is in love with his fate and will do anything to complete the deed.  These three unlikely allies create a tentative alliance, and have to go to drastic measures to survive, as the world goes more and more insane around them.

This novel leaves you with so many questions, and an impossible moral debate.  Luckily there’s more in this incredible series, but the chilling realism of this book stays with you long after turning the final page.  Everyone should read this novel, if as nothing else a warning of the future.  You may say that there’s no chance that we can ever do something like this, but read on and look to today and how we’re already tumbling towards it.  This book stays with you forever, and this series should be a classic, and is a must read for all, teen or adult.

If you like this, try readingHunger Games by Suzanne Collins, Divergent by Veronica Roth, I am Number Four by Pittacus Lore

Reviewer Rating: 5/5 Stars

Where can I find a copy?:  Paper copy available at Fairfield Public Library and Fairfield Woods Branch Library, Digital copy downloadable from Overdrive through Fairfield Public Library, and audio copy downloadable from RBdigital through Fairfield Public Library.

Recommended by-Josie, a teen reader

Gabi, A Girl in Pieces

gabi

Title: Gabi, A Girl in Pieces

Author: Isabel Quintero

Summary: During her senior year of high school, Gabi Hernandez keeps a diary about the things that are on her mind: friends, her appearance, guys, family, college and the future. Each piece of her life has its own complications and contradictions: Her best friends are dealing with coming out and an unplanned pregnancy. Her dad is in and out of her life due to his meth addiction. And does a Mexican-American girl from a poor neighborhood really have any chance of getting in to college, let alone her top choice school? Gabi finds herself making serious decisions about her life and the person she wants to be, as well as discovering her talents as a writer and artist over the course of an awful, wonderful, unforgettable year.

Don’t let the strange-looking cover fool you  – this is an incredible book and worthy 2017 High School Nutmeg nominee, as well as a Printz Honor winner, for a reason. If the story sounds melodramatic, that’s because it is – but only a bit more so than the life of any teen girl  growing up today. What makes this book extraordinary is its clear-eyed portrayal of the ups and downs that make up an ordinary life. You will be so glad to have spent time observing the world through Gabi’s eyes and will miss her frank, unsentimental voice in your head once the story is done. This is a book that teens and parents should consider reading together – adults could learn quite a bit about what life feels like for young people today.

Who will like this book?: Mature readers who like realistic, contemporary fiction. People who like multicultural stories. People who like reading books in diary format.

If you like this, try this: Rats Saw God by Rob Thomas. Yaqui Delgado…by Meg Medina. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz.

Recommended by: Nicole, Teen Librarian