Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up With Me by Mariko Tamaki

29981020.jpgFreddy continuously finds herself being broken up with by her dream girl, Laura Dean. They break up, they get back together, they break up again, and so the cycle goes. Until one day Freddy receives advice telling her to break up with Laura Dean first. She begins to question who is really at fault in their relationship. Throughout this story of young love, readers follow Freddy through failing friendships, new relationships, self discovery, and most importantly, a realization and embrace of what is best for her. For fans of realistic fiction and graphic novels with beautiful art, this book is highly recommended!

– Indiana

The Music of What Happens by Bill Konigsberg

35442700After his fathers death, Jordan and his mother attempt to get their old food truck running again. When things don’t go exactly as planned, Max, who is practically a stranger, attempts to save the day. Readers follow Max and Jordan as they quickly become food truck connoisseurs and maybe more than strangers. Throughout the book, both main characters attempt to overcome serious issues, including mental illness and sexual assault. If you enjoy realistic fiction (or prickly pear), give this book a try!

Indiana

Bloom by Kevin Panetta

29225589This sweet monochromatic graphic novel follows Ari, a recent high school graduate, as he attempts to work out his future. Ari wants nothing to do with his family’s bakery; he wants to travel with friends, move to a big city, and play music with his band. When looking for his replacement, Ari meets Hector. While making batches of bread, a beautiful relationship blooms. However, Ari’s anxiety inevitably gets in the way. This book is perfect for lovers of graphic novels, romance, or even baking!

Indiana9781626726413

Here We Are

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Title: Here We Are: 44 Voices Write, Draw and Speak About Feminism

Editor: Kelly Jensen

Summary: “There’s no right way and no wrong way. There are no dead ends. The journey is always changing, always shifting, and influenced by our own experiences and perspectives.” This diverse collection of superbly-written essays, sharply-drawn comics, fun lists and engrossing interviews is a fantastic compendium of contemporary thought on the history, evolution, and current state of feminism for every reader. Organized into topics including body image, gender, sexuality, pop culture, relationships, confidence, and independence, these pieces will introduce you to the concept of intersectionality (the idea that social categorizations are overlapping and interdependent) and encourage you to find your own definition of what it means to be a feminist.Because it’s a collection, you can read just on topics that interest you, pick the pieces by writers you love, or take on the whole thing and discover new voices who will challenge you to see the world in a new way.

Heartfelt stories from beloved writers and artists including Laurie Halse Anderson, Mindy Kaling, Malinda Lo, Liz Prince, Laverne Cox and Daniel Jose Older, as well as pieces from some extraordinary ‘ordinary’ women who have made a difference through their lives and work make this a terrific collection for anyone interested learning more about the many ways one can approach the challenges of what it means to be a woman.  Sure to start some amazing conversations, Here We Are is a great book to read and talk about during Women’s History Month, and that should be shared amongst family and friends.

Who will like this book?: Anyone interested in learning about what it means to be a feminist today. Readers who are sure they are not feminist: You might be surprised to learn that maybe…you are!

If you like this, read this: We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie. Bossypants by Tina Fey. For mature readers: Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay.

Recommended by: Nicole, Teen Librarian